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“And the first lesson of all was the basic trust that he could learn. It is shocking to find how many people do not believe they can learn, and how many more believe learning to be difficult. Muad’Dib knew that every experience carries its lesson.”
— Dune, Frank Herbert.

  • but, on many occasions this adaptation of nebulous analysis can deliver a surprising degree of accuracy.

    One other aspect of this mode of thinking is that over time with experience larger leaps of intuition can be made with a particular  sense of ‘knowing’, with a consistent degree of reliability, but this is much dependent on the breadth and quality of stored data.

    If we are to trust our gut in a critical situation, it’s probably a good idea to check that we have tried to adopt a healthy sense of grounded humility. Emotional instability can severely disrupt the intuitive cognitive process and sabotage any attempts to adhere to established protocol.

    Ni relies on FE to counterbalance false claims about what the structure of new data is actually telling us. If FE is overlooked and instead we head straight to TI a negative NI-TI feedback-loop can occur, favouring internal dialogue over outside influence. The data cloud perspective can soon become tunnel vision with a warped logic that sees no error in extracting facts from fantasy.

    FE gives us access to the real world through external feedback, in contrast to being caught in ones own echo chamber of introversion.

    With NI and FE working together in harmony we have a great tool set to chart unknown territory; it’s our go to interpreter of the world.

    The INFJ’s enterprising process of producing ideas can appear slightly odd in comparison to other personality types and may show up in the world in unconventional ways. But, with time and due diligence the results of this unique mode of learning can positively influence society and stimulate change that can open up new vistas hitherto unimagined…

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“In Budapest, surgeons operated on printer's apprentice Gyoergyi Szabo, 17, who, brooding over the loss of a sweetheart, had set her name in type and swollowed the type.”
— Time Magazine 1936. From the book
Just My Type, by Simon Garfield.